Caring for Your Landscape

Tis the Season…Time to Winter Water

Posted by on Dec 3, 2012 in Caring for Your Landscape, Landscape Inspiration | 0 comments

What a festive reminder to winter water our gardens in Colorado. This season has been exceptionally dry and warm and we are likely to stay in drought according to the NOAA’s climate prediction center. Our intense sun and drying winds coupled with drought make supplemental water crucial for our plants especially our conifers and broadleaf evergreens to survive and thrive. Here are some Fall and Winter Watering Guidelines water only when air temperatures are above 40 degrees F apply water at mid-day so it will have time to soak in before freezing at night soak to a depth of about 12″ around the drip line of the tree or shrub water about once per month if we...

Read More

Cutting Back Ornamental Grasses

Posted by on Feb 28, 2012 in Caring for Your Landscape | 0 comments

Now that the snow is gone, and spring is just around the corner, its time to cut back your cool season ornamental grasses.  These grasses start growing very early in the spring season, and should be cut prior to the new growth.  Along the front range in Colorado, this is around March 1st (weather permitting).  Don’t know which ones are cool season?  Here are a few of the common ones found in our gardens:  The Feather Reed Grasses, including Karl Forester, Blue Oat Grass, Northern Sea Oats, Tufted Hair Grass, and the Blue Fescue’s. Use a sharp hedge shears or a sickle and cut approximately 6″ above the soil line (Blue Oat Grass can be left a bit...

Read More

On Wisdom and Weeds…

Posted by on Apr 26, 2011 in Caring for Your Landscape | 0 comments

Wisdom is with those who receive counsel, so don’t weep or worry, I will give you assistance on how to wage war on those weeds.  With all this moisture we’ve received in the last week, everything is happily growing including the weeds, sometimes they can be quite pretty. There are many ways to consider weed management, today I will introduce you to a couple of alternatives. First, removing by hand is the least  offensive to the environment, but probably the most time consuming.  If you garden organically, you might want to consider the benefits of adding them into you diet. (Healthy diet and exercise in the garden are both good things, so if we look at it...

Read More